10 Symptoms Women Should Not Ignore

Share Button

Submitted by Angela Zito Crawford

Spectrum Health Regional Cancer Center

womanarmupWho knew that switching to stretchy pants or having a tight shoe could signal serious health problems? Don’t assume these issues will just go away. Your life could depend on it. Life is a balancing act for many women today. Between an active family, aging parents and a demanding job, they hardly have time for themselves. So it’s easy to brush off symptoms such as weight loss, fatigue or irregular bleeding.

Symptoms often evolve gradually, so they are easy to discount. But many can be signs of the most common gynecologic cancers: endometrial, cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal and vulvar.

Below are 10 symptoms that shouldn’t be ignored. Having these symptoms doesn’t mean you need to panic, but it does mean you should check it out. If you see yourself on this list, call your gynecologist or primary care doctor.

1. Abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge

2. Unexplained weight loss

3. Can’t stay away from the bathroom

4. A bloated belly or pain in your pelvis or abdomen

5. Constant fatigue

6. Swollen leg

7. No appetite or a feeling of being full

8. Feeling queasy, having nausea or fighting indigestion

9. Vulva problems including color changes, itching or burning

10. Pain in the pelvis, abdomen or back

10 Things Anyone Can Do To Lead Healthier Lives

Share Button

Thank you to PRWeb for supplying this article. What are your thoughts? Please share in the comments section below…..

healthillustratedThousands of books have been written on what to eat, how to exercise and even where to work in order to enjoy a healthier, happier life. But the keys to a long, vital life are basic. The International Council on Active Aging (ICAA) has put together the 10 tips below based on recent research. And in most cases, they apply to people of all ages.

1. THINK POSITIVE. Strive for success in all you endeavors, especially those related to your health or fitness program. Negative thoughts can become self-fulfilling prophecies. And never let your age be a barrier. Research has shown that thinking positively about getting older can lengthen your life by as much as 7.5 years.

2. TURN YOUR SPARK INTO A FLAME. Do you have a passion, talent or hobby that you do well at? Nurture it, grow it, and let that enthusiasm spill over into other areas of life.

3. KEEP YOUR MOTOR RUNNING. Lacking energy and motivation may result from challenges in your life as simple as losing focus on your goals. If you suspect your lethargy is caused by physical or mental health issues, by all means see a healthcare professional. But don’t underestimate your ability to recharge through lifestyle changes and gain the energy to do the things you love to do when you want to do them. Having energy and motivation are hallmarks of healthy living.

4. EAT A BALANCED DIET. This is the one you knew was coming: a balanced diet and healthy weight are keys to physical and mental health. Instead of the latest fad diet, start with a common-sense approach – eat lots of fruits and vegetables, go easy on the sugar and salt. Cut back on calories if your weight is trending the wrong way. You can do it!

5. REGULAR EXERCISE. Staying physically active fuels the body and mind and helps prevent physical and mental decline. If you’re already exercising regularly, keep it up. If you’re just getting started, set realistic goals based on your own fitness level, then move towards them at your own pace. Just walking for as little as 10 minutes, 3 times a day is infinitely better than doing nothing. The key is to be consistent. Get started!

6. CONNECT WITH PEOPLE. Keep your social life active. Go out with friends to see a movie or enjoy a coffee. Even better, do volunteer work on a regular basis. Research shows that people who volunteer have higher levels of well-being and life satisfaction than people who don’t. Volunteering and other kinds of civic and social engagement can contribute to better health.

7. DON’T STAY DOWN. Everyone feels down at times, but full-blown depression is a major cause of disability and cannot be ignored. If you’re feeling out of sorts for two weeks or more, talk with your doctor. In many instances, exercising and changing to a healthier diet can help lift you out of the doldrums.

8. KEEP LEARNING. Studies show that lifelong learning is good for you. Learning adds a needed dimension to life, whether it involves staying in touch with what is happening in the world or keeping the brain stimulated. The best news is that you can start learning new subjects or physical activities at any age. So why not start today?

9. INVEST IN YOU. Shifting your expectations of yourself – then embarking on new behaviors to realize your goals – takes energy and effort. Consider your effort to improve as a small investment in a plan that pays big dividends. The results will be well worth it.

10.HAVE FUN! A healthy life is generally a life filled with joy and laughter. So do what you need to do to kick up your heels and have a good time. Ride a bike, learn a language, take up square dancing. Step outside of your comfort zone if you have to. Make 2015 the best year ever to be alive.

About International Council on Active Aging

ICAA, an association that leads, connects and defines the active-aging industry, supports professionals who develop wellness facilities, programs and services for adults over 50. The association is focused on active aging, an approach to aging that helps older adults live as fully as possible within all dimensions of wellness; and provides its members with education, information, resources and tools. As an active-aging educator and advocate, ICAA has advised numerous organizations and governmental bodies. These include the US Administration on Aging, the National Institute on Aging (one of the US National Institutes of Health), the US Department of Health and Human Services, Canada’s Special Senate Committee on Aging, and the British Columbia ministries of Health, and Healthy Living and Sport, among others. To learn more about ICAA, visit: http://www.icaa.cc

10 Spring Break Safety Tips For College Students

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb and SABRE. Please share your thoughts below…..

teensEach year, upwards of 1.5 million students go on spring break*, a peak travel season that poses many risks for college-aged men and women. The truth is that the spring break environment – however fun – can lead to negative consequences such as sexual assault, alcohol poisoning, serious injuries and more. This frightening reality is why SABRE is distributing its top 10 tips to reduce safety and health risks this vacation season.

While a safety mindset should be applied to every part of your vacation (alcohol-related or not), we know that binge drinking plays a significant role in spring break safety risks. In fact, 91% of parents think spring break marketing and drink promotions should be stopped – but free or cheap alcohol access was an important factor in deciding to go on a spring break trip for two in five women**. Here are 10 tips to help drinkers and non-drinkers alike stay safe on spring break:

1. Arrive safely. Driving through the night to make it down to Florida or other sunny destinations is common for spring breakers. But the National Safety Council says traffic death rates are three times greater at night than during the day. If you can’t avoid night driving, have at least one person stay awake to talk to driver.

2. Don’t take chances at your hotel. Lock the doors, and secure important belongings like passports and wallets in the safe. SABRE’s door stop alarm is portable and can alert you if someone tries to break-in. Make sure it’s in your suitcase this spring break.

3. Be smart about who you give personal information out to; don’t tell new acquaintances your hotel or room number. You never know who has innocent or dangerous intentions.

4. Make sure you know the name and address of your hotel or take a hotel business card out with you so you can give it to a cab driver. This is especially important if you don’t speak the local language.

5. The buddy system – it works! We do NOT recommend you leave a party with a stranger; it’s always best to take a friend with you. If for whatever reason you do leave without your friends, give them details about where you’re going and when to expect you back.

6. Practice safe drinking – take turns so that one friend in the group per night will plan on minimal drinking to look out for everyone. Other good habits: watching your cup or glass, and only accept drinks that you’ve watched get made or poured in front of you.

7. If you need help, ask for it. If there’s an emergency don’t rely on a bystander to call for help. Call for help yourself to be sure first responders or police gets the message.

8. Hydrate & wear sunscreen. Heat stroke and melanoma aren’t happy spring break thoughts, but too much time in the sun can leave you dehydrated with an increased risk of sunburns. Take your SPF and a bottle of water to the beach.

9. If traveling outside of the country, be sure to look up the address or contact information for the American consulate or U.S. Embassy in the country where you’re headed. Be sure to tell friends and relatives in the U.S. of your travel itinerary and try to check in with them often.

10. Carry a small, practical, and easy to use personal protection tool like pepper spray or a personal alarm. SABRE Red pepper spray and SABRE personal alarms are legal to carry in all 50 states.

For more information about how to adopt a safe and healthy lifestyle, visit the SABRE website http://www.sabrered.com.

About SABRE:

SABRE Security Equipment Corporation provides best-in-class personal safety, home security and law enforcement products to maximize consumers’ safety. The company strives to educate and empower customers with the knowledge and powerful products needed if and when someone is in danger. SABRE believes that everyone should be protected so that they can live a safe, healthy life with peace of mind.

10 Parent Do-Overs For 2015

Share Button

By Mary Jo Rapini, MEd, LPC

familydrivewayWhen my first daughter was six and my youngest was two, I came to a realization that helped me parent in a much different fashion. You see, I’ve always been a neat freak and I prefer structure and order in my home. Beds made, no dust, and I’m happy. No one told me I couldn’t have that and kids too, but it wasn’t long before I realized I would stress myself into a heart attack if I continued.

When you have kids, you should actually think of living in a barn because kids are hoarders; they’re messy; they spill anything they carry; and they are curious and forgetful. They don’t close doors, clean up toys, worry about mud, clean up art supplies or Cheerios. And, unless you pacify them with electronic gadgets (which don’t stimulate their creative ingenuity as well as hands on manipulating things), your home will be full of rocks, leaves, sand and bugs.

Every parent I know who has a teenager or college-bound child reminisces about what they would do differently if they had a baby or small children now. Many of the things they say are enlightening and helpful when you are sure you’re losing your mind with the little ones. I have come up with a list of ten things for parents to consider for 2015 as they continue raising their children.

I’ve found that hindsight gives you great insight, and if you hang in there a few more months, what drives you mad now will be gone with the next thing your child finds interesting. So, stay curious and take naps.

1. Play with your child every chance you get. Instead of putting them in front of the TV or iPad, get down on the floor and play with them. Your child’s brain is developing at a speed you cannot understand. Every opportunity to play is an opportunity for your child to connect with you and their environment.

2. Work on your relationship with your spouse or partner. Your child will be far better off if you keep your marriage intimate and close. They need your marriage more than they need you 24/7. Dads give children something moms cannot, and visa versa.

3. Power nap with your child. Instead of thinking about all the things you can get done at naptime, lay down and nap. Your power nap will give you more energy and clearer thinking, and both of those will benefit your child more than cleaning.

4. Forget the electronics until your child is in kindergarten. Coloring, gluing, and cutting are much more important for your child’s motor and cognitive development than an electronic alphabet game. Being able to create new ideas with art supplies and blocks is not only a way for them to develop motor skills, but it also builds confidence and cognitive skills.

5. Go to the park any and all chances you get. Being outside and running, swinging, jumping, and observing is everything to your child. You playing with them helps them grow closer to you and the wonder of all they see. Talking on the phone or distracting yourself with work is not worth it when you are at the park with your child. Take the time…and be there.

kidseatinghealthy6. Make lunches and cook with your child. Yes, it will be a mess, and yes, you will have to clean it up, but children who touch food and learn to make healthy food choices are also at an advantage as they grow older and become more independent.

7. Quit stressing over what is normal for your child. Kids grow at different rates and no two children are at the same height and weight at the same time. Relax. Use your intuition and parent sense to help guide you.

8. Your child is not going to go to prison because they won’t share their toys. New parents make mountains out of molehills, and if their child is more stubborn or temperamental, they make the issue worse than it is. Staying structured with rules and following through with discipline is important, but don’t stress over the little stuff.

9. Hug your child EVERY chance you get. Someday you will miss when they no longer want you to carry them, and they will grow out of wanting to sit in your lap during story time.

10. Never parent with guilt. Sometimes you have to be firm and that means teaching your child there are consequences for their actions. But, yelling or screaming at your child should never be done, and they are very forgiving; so always apologize.

No one tells us how to parent, and kids don’t come with an instruction manual. So, it is wisdom of hindsight that helps new parents feel comforted during the rough times…and there will be rough times. Kids get sick, they don’t sleep, they like bugs and messes and spill water, milk and anything liquid. Love them anyway.

– Mary Jo Rapini, MEd, LPC, is a licensed psychotherapist and co-author with Janine J. Sherman, of Start Talking: A Girl’s Guide for You and Your Mom About Health, Sex or Whatever. Read more about the book at StartTalkingBook.com and more about Rapini at maryjorapini.com.

10 Tips To Manage Psoriasis And Eczema This Winter

Share Button

Thank you to PRWeb for supplying this informative article. What are your thoughts, please share in the comments section below…..

jogsnowAccording to Dermatologists Dr. Joshua Fox and Dr. Robert Levine, Psoriasis and Eczema are painful. They make everyday actions uncomfortable and they carry a stigma that can lead to a loss of self-esteem, depression, and other health complications.

A shocking number of Americans have psoriasis and eczema—39 million adults and children—which is more than four times the population of New York City, the largest city in the US. According to dermatology specialists Dr. Joshua Fox and Dr. Robert Levine with Advanced Dermatology, PC, the seasonal change to cold, dry air creates difficulties for people dealing with these chronic skin disorders.

“It is important to manage symptoms,” says Dr. Fox, who has served on the board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. “Psoriasis and eczema can be painful. They can make everyday actions uncomfortable for adults and children, men and women, and they carry a stigma that can lead to a loss of self-esteem, depression, and other health complications.”

Symptoms

Psoriasis appears on the skin as red or white, scaly patches that often itch and bleed. The patches can also look scaly or silvery in color. Nails can become yellow, ridged and separate from the nail bed. Up to 30 percent of people with the disease develop psoriatic arthritis, and recent studies indicate that patients with moderate to severe disease are also at increased risk for other associated health conditions, including heart disease, heart attack, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, depression and hypertension.

Eczema, a hypersensitivity disease, inflames the skin, causing pain, itching, dryness, swelling, cracking, weeping and scaling. Eczema lesions can bubble, ooze, and crust over if scratched. Skin infections can occur if bacteria invade the skin lesions.

Diagnosis

“Once patients understand their psoriasis or eczema is not contagious, they seem to be relieved,” says Dr. Fox. “They are comforted to know there is help for their symptoms.”

Psoraisis is an autoimmune disease apparently cause by an overactive immune system that overproduces skin cells. Eczema, on the other hand, is caused by a deficient immune system in which an imbalance of skin proteins creates skin sensitivities. “This is a significant distinction because it informs treatment,” explains Dr. Fox. “A dermatologist will diagnose the condition and provide the most effective care for individual patients.”

Psoriasis treatments:

* Topical creams, such as corticosteroids, calcipotriene, anthralin, salicylic acid, and coal tars, to reduce inflammation and dissolve skin lesions

* Laser therapy with ultraviolet (UVB) light

* Systemic medications taken orally or by injection that suppress or control the immune system

Eczema treatments:

* Topical creams, such as corticosteroids (severe) and hydrocortisones (mild), to reduce inflammation

* Immunomodulator creams that control inflammation and immune system reactions

* Systemic pills that suppress the immune system

* Prescription strength moisturizers that restore the skin barrier

* Oral antihistamines to relieve inflammation

* Diluted bleach baths and antibiotics to treat infection

Dr. Fox’s and Dr. Levine’s tips for managing psoriasis and eczema throughout the winter

* Moisturize. Use a non-irritating, fragrance-free moisturizer. Thick ointments are best for locking in moisture and repairing the skin barrier.

* Limit bathing. Take warm (not hot) baths not more than once per day. Pat the skin dry with a towel (do not rub) and apply moisturizer immediately following.

* Choose a mild, non-irritating soap. Use sparingly.

* Use a humidifier indoors. The ideal range is 45-55 percent humidity.

* Wear loose, soft clothing. Choose cotton over wool, denim, or other harsh fabrics. Wear gloves and scarfs outside to protect exposed skin.

* Avoid sweating. Sweat can trigger flare-ups. Wear wicking fabrics and change out of damp or snowy clothes as soon as possible.

* Keep fingernails short. This decreases the likelihood that scratching will tear the skin and lead to infection.

* Hydrate. Drink plenty of water.

* Reduce stress. While this is easier said than done during the busy holidays, stress can trigger flares.

* Identify and eliminate possible triggers. Some common triggers include wool, soaps, fragrance, pet fur, cosmetics, and household cleaners. Some patients have found relief by altering their diets.

Dr. Levine counsels that people with either psoriasis or eczema should consult their dermatologist to get an accurate diagnosis and discuss the pros and cons of different treatments options.

Advanced Dermatology P.C., the Center for Laser and Cosmetic Surgery (New York & New Jersey) provides cutting edge medical, laser & cosmetic dermatology and plastic surgery services. http://www.advanceddermatologypc.com

Joshua L. Fox, M.D., F.A.A.D., is the founder and medical director at Advanced Dermatology P.C. He is a leading authority in the field of dermatology with expertise in skin cancer, cosmetic surgery and laser procedures and is program director of a fellowship in laser and cosmetic surgery

Robert Levine, D.O., F.A.O.C.D. is experienced in many areas of medical and surgical dermatology with an interest in cosmetics.

10 Early Warning Signs Of Parkinson’s Disease

Share Button

By Hooman Azmi

newsAs many as one million Americans live with Parkinson’s disease: This is more than the combined number of people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy and Lou Gehrig’s disease. [1]

Parkinson’s is characterized by a lack of dopamine in the brain which, as a result, inhibits functioning in the central nervous system. “People with Parkinson’s disease may lose up to 80% of dopamine in their bodies before symptoms appear.”[2] Early treatment can include introducing various medications that will replace, prevent the breakdown of, or mimic the properties of dopamine in the body. Deep Brain Stimulation is also a common option in patients who don’t respond to medication or who exhibit an advanced condition because it utilizes a high frequency electrode to provide stimulation to the impaired movement center of the brain.

“Early intervention is the key to a high functioning, superior quality of life. Therefore, it is crucial for people to be aware of the early signs and symptoms of this debilitating disease.” – Dr. Hooman Azmi.

According the Parkinson’s Foundation, there are 10 early warning signs of Parkinson’s disease.

They include:

* Tremors or Shaking

* Small Handwriting

* Loss of Smell

* Trouble Sleeping

* Trouble Moving or Walking

* Constipation

* A Soft or Low Voice

* Masked Face

* Dizziness or Fainting

* Stooping or Hunching Over

To learn more about Parkinson’s disease, its warning signs and treatment options, Dr. Azmi is available for interviews. Please contact Steve Allen Media at sara@steveallenmedia.com or 201-906-8251 or 661-255-8283.

– Hooman Azmi, M.D., Director of the Division of Movement Disorders at Hackensack UMC, specializes in the surgical treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. Dr. Azmi explains, “For those patients who are diagnosed early, we are able to successfully treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s with several medications and surgical procedures.”

[1] According to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation

[2] According to Parkinson’s Health.com

10 Things Your Doctor Won’t Tell You

Share Button

By Armand Leone, Jr., MD, JD

doctorThe patient physician relationship is unique and is based on trust and open communication. However, physicians do not always share the insider’s view about the healthcare system that they know. There are things that doctors know from their experiences that they don’t tell patients. Here are 10 things that physicians know but don’t tell their patients:

1. Having elective surgery on a Friday or in the afternoon carries a higher mortality and complication rate than earlier in the week or day.

2. Being admitted to the hospital on a weekend with a serious condition carries a higher mortality and complication rate than being admitted during the week.

3. Doctors know the limits of modern medicine and most don’t choose heroic cancer treatments or end of life care.

4. What their surgical and procedure complication rates are and how those compare to the national rates for the same.

5. A misdiagnosis occurs in at least 1 out of every 20 patient encounters in doctors’ offices.

6. Surgery to remove partial meniscal tears does not result in better knee function than medical treatment and physical therapy alone.

7. Bad outcomes after spinal decompression back surgery are so common there is a specifically designated ICD-9-CM billing code for when they fail called “Post-Laminectomy Syndrome”.

8. The quality of care decreases and medical errors increase during July which is when graduated interns, residents, nurses and other new health care workers first report to work at many of the nation’s hospitals and to start practicing medicine.

9. Fatal medication errors alone spike by 10% every July as new medical residents start taking care of patients.

10. Learning a new surgical technique, even for an established surgeon, requires a learning curve and, yet, every surgeon has to perform a procedure for the first time … where do you fall on their learning curve.

– Armand Leone, Jr., MD, JD, MBA Partner and Co-Founder of Britcher, Leone & Roth. Armand is also a board certified diagnostic radiologist

10 Helpful Tips To Prepare Your Child With Autism For School

Share Button

By Pamela Bryson-Weaver, R.D.H, author of Living autism day.by.day

schoolbusWith the school opening looming up ahead, the idea of transitioning your child with autism can prove to be daunting. Starting school can be a difficult time even for normal kids, more so with a child who has limited cognitive, social, and other developmental skills. Like normal kids, children on the spectrum also feel the same excitement and anxiety. This change can be difficult for them— the scenery, the people, their responsibility as students, co-existing with others, and so on. This often leads to sudden (and somehow negative) changes in behavior.

By now, you must have already looked into a number of schools in your area and have found the right one for your child. To gear your child for the so-called “first day high,” try looking into these helpful tips and see if any of these can work with his or her level of ASD.

1. Try creating a social story to go along with the preparation. Pictures and video presentation prove to be effective channels to show them what school is like, how to go with the usual morning/afternoon routine, and other school activities.

2. Create creatively the list of daily activities he or she will have to take from waking up to brushing, walking/riding to school, entering the classroom, and so on. If possible, try to ask the school administration if it is okay for you and your child to look around.

3. Prepare a calendar complete with pictures. Indicate lunch with the picture of the school cafeteria or toilet time with the comfort room or playtime with a picture of the school playground with children playing.

4. Before school officially starts, ask if it is okay for your child to meet his or her new teacher. Let the teacher and the school’s guidance counselor know about certain “obsessions” that your child may have. Often, visiting school ahead of time and meeting the people he or she will encounter head-on can ease their way into transition.

5. Communicate, communicate. Whatever your child’s ASD level, it is imperative that you ask about what he or she feels. Engage him or her in the whole process. His or her feelings should come first and foremost on this journey. Make him or her feel secured and assured, that school is a safe haven. Instill happy thoughts in meeting new friends. He or she may be socially challenged, but this does not negate the thought of feeling the same level of excitement in meeting new acquaintances.

6. Reassure your child that school is his or her second home. While “Mommy” or “Daddy” help resolves problems for him at home, he or she now has an extra set of helping hands with “teacher” (be specific with the name of the teacher to make him familiar) around.

7. Try to check if there are kids in the neighborhood who will be going on the same classes with your child. Sometimes, letting them connect to others before school starts can greatly eliminate unforeseen circumstances during transition.

8. Make sure to find out what after-school activities can your child join. Some sports activities are excellent activities for children with ASDs.

9. Include your child’s therapist on this process. It is imperative that you are fully guided on every endeavor you pursue to ensure zero meltdown.

10. Be extra attentive. Some kids on the spectrum have a hard time coping with these sudden changes. Make sure to prioritize your child’s welfare before anything else.

Each child with Autism Spectrum Disorder has a different way of dealing with changes in their environment. These tips may prove to be effective to others but, in everything else, you alone know what works best for him or her.

– Pamela Bryson-Weaver is the author of Living autism day.by.day: Daily Reflections & Strategies to Give You Hope and Courage, being published in October by Freedom Abound, Inc. October is Autism Awareness Month in Canada (Bryson-Weaver lives in New Brunswick). Autism Awareness Month in the U.S. Is April. Since her son was diagnosed with autism 15 years ago, Bryson-Weaver has become an advocate, speaker and activist for children with special needs, children who are close to heart. Learn more at livingautismnow.com.

Disclaimer – The Your Health Journal web site is for advice and information purposes only. It is meant to be an educational site. Opinions expressed by other individuals on this web site through guest posts or comments does not mean the creators of this website support their opinions or products. In fact, anything written on this site does not mean it is endorsed by anyone affiliated with this web site! Although we try to do checks of anyone who contributes to our site, we can also not be responsible for any false information they give, whether in their title, or facts they send. If you see an error, please send an email, and we will fix it immediately or remove an the article. If you have a question about the article, you should contact the author directly.

10 Simple Dos And Don’ts For Parents To Raise Emotionally Healthy Children

Share Button

By Mary Jo Rapini, MEd, LPC

groupkidswbgEveryone wants happy, successful children, but everyone parents in a way that increases the chance that this will happen. The reasons are simple: parenting great kids is a lot of work. It’s uninterrupted, consistent, hands-on dirty work at times, but if you delegate parent’s work to teachers, youth leaders, or someone other than yourself, then your kids don’t end up getting what they need. What do they need? Well, they don’t need more after school programs, computer classes, or the latest game.

They need discipline, chores, family dinners and engaged adults who are willing to be parents and not friends.

1. Do pay attention to your kids when they are talking and demand they do the same with you. Having your focus on your phone when your child is trying to talk to you tells them their feelings don’t matter. Minimizing or ignoring your kid’s feelings is a big no-no.

2, Do not be your child’s friend. Do be their parent.

3. Give your child chores and follow through with consequences when they don’t do them. Taking something away from your child means you take it away with a chance for them to earn it back.

4. Don’t bend rules or be inconsistent with rules. Whatever was a rule yesterday should remain a rule today, tomorrow and next week.

5. Don’t compare your child to you when you were a child, to their sibling or to a friend they have. This only leads to judgment, resentfulness and anger. Your child will show you with their behavior what your constant comparing has done to them, and you won’t like the way it looks.

6. Don’t ever talk badly about your child’s other parent. This makes children anxious and depressed and they end up with distorted views about what love is.

7. Encourage your child to take calculated risks, and don’t bail them out when they make a mistake. Your child is supposed to make mistakes. This is how they learn. Constantly hovering or making excuses for them turns them into enabled, entitled adults who cannot think for themselves without wanting help.

8. Do let your kids come to you for advice, but let them work out solutions for their own interpersonal and school-related relationships. The one exception is bullying, and this is an area you should get involved with taking your child’s side if they are the victim.

groupkids9. Do become part of your child’s team, but don’t baby them. If they have an assignment due in the morning and they must stay up late, make sure they have a well lit place to study, but don’t make yourself a martyr staying up late with them. Compliment their commitment, but go to bed. In real life, we all have to make sacrifices for our choices. School represents work for a child.

10. Whenever possible, no matter how old your child is, hug them as much as you can and tell them how happy you are they are yours.

Parenting will always be the toughest job any of us can take on, but if you decide to take it on, do it with the commitment and follow through you give your other jobs. You cannot parent part-time, nor can you take a sabbatical when times get tough with your kids. Signing your kid up for one more class can never fix what is broken at home.

– Mary Jo Rapini, MEd, LPC, is a licensed psychotherapist and co-author with Janine J. Sherman, of Start Talking: A Girl’s Guide for You and Your Mom About Health, Sex or Whatever. Read more about the book at www.StartTalkingBook.com and more about Rapini at www.maryjorapini.com.

Top 10 Effective Ways To Combat Anxiety – Part 2

Share Button

By Agnes Jimenez

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

SleepingWoman5. Get back to the basics.

Are you getting enough sleep at night? Are you eating well-balanced nutritious food or drive-thru garbage? What you eat makes a big difference in how well you handle stress. Sadly, many people turn to drugs and alcohol to self-medicate their worries away. Taking care of your mind, body, and spirit is one of the top ways to effectively treat anxiety.

6. Use visualization.

Close your eyes and see yourself in a place that feels peaceful. Picture yourself walking along a sandy beach or playing with a cute little puppy. Let these good feelings wash over you until you feel relaxed. Ahhh, feel your toes in the warm sand?

7. You’re not perfect and you never will be.

Aren’t you surprised, especially in today’s society, how much pressure is placed upon people to be perfect or extremely successful? But guess what? You don’t have to be the best at everything you do. Failure is simply a learning process. The more you fail, the more you learn. Sounds like success to me.

8. Meditation is a superior calming tool.

Meditating, or calming the mind, is a superb way to get rid of anxiety. Anxiety stems from a racing mind. Meditation is the opposite of that. Meditation is simply stopping your rampant mind chatter in order to bring you instant peace. It’s not wishy-washy. Trust me, it’s good stuff.

9. Be honest with yourself.

If you were ever in a certain situation that justified fear like getting mugged or being personally attacked, that’s understandable. However, what are the chances that it will ever happen again? Virtually zero. Let it go.

10. Give yourself a treat.

If and when you do face your fears, be sure to reward yourself. Reinforce your success with things that please you like a professional massage, a meal at your favorite restaurant, or buying a new CD. It doesn’t matter what it is, as long as it makes you happy. Perhaps a new car? Wow! You really did conquer your fears!

– Agnes Jimenez is a professional blogger and writer. She writes for many online establishments and currently partners with ComprehendTheMind.com in spreading awareness about the day to day psychological stresses ordinary individuals have to deal on their own. Comprehend The Mind is a diagnostic and treatment center for a variety of mental health, developmental and educational difficulties that offer neuropsychological, psychological and educational evaluations and testing as well as forensic assessments.