Association Between Chronic Pain And Obesity

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

obesityThe literature suggests that obesity and pain are significant co-morbidities, adversely impacting each other. The nature of the relationship however is not likely to be direct, and many interacting factors appear to contribute.

The Journal of Pain Research has published the review “The Association between Chronic Pain and Obesity”.

As corresponding author Professor Akiko Okifuji says “Both obesity and chronic pain are serious public health concerns in our society. They also co-occur often, although it is not to say that one causes the other. Rather, there appear to be multiple factors that contribute to each of these conditions. It is clear though that when they do co-occur, the adverse impact of the problems is much worse than each of them alone. Treating each of these conditions can be challenging; obesity further complicates the treatment of chronic pain and vice versa.”

Professor Okifuji continues “Our paper highlights the significance of the relationship and need for further research. Further clinical research evaluating the nature of the relationship is urgently needed in order for us to develop innovative and optimal therapies to address the comorbidity of pain and obesity.”

As Dr. Michael Schatman, Editor-in-Chief, explains “This paper represents an important contribution to the literature, given the increasing rates of obesity as well as the stigmatization of obese pain sufferers.”

The Journal of Pain Research is an international, peer-reviewed, open access, online journal that welcomes laboratory and clinical findings in the fields of pain research and the prevention and management of pain.

Dove Medical Press Ltd is a privately held company specializing in the publication of Open Access peer-reviewed journals across the broad spectrum of science, technology and especially medicine.

Hard Truths Of Fighting Fat

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Beverly Hills Physicians…..please share your comments below as weight loss surgery has always been a controversial topic. According to WebMD, you may be a candidate for weight loss surgery if:

* You’re an obese adult, especially if you have a weight-related condition, such as type 2 diabetes.

* You know the risks and benefits.

* You’re ready to adjust how you eat after the surgery.

* You’re committed to making lifestyle changes to keep the weight off.

Ultimately, this sensitive topic should be discussed with your physician to see if it is the right move for you.

weightlossballtextSouthern California based medical group Beverly Hills Physicians (BHP) sees a great many patients exploring weight loss surgery as well as non-surgical paths to weight loss, and they typically experience a surge of interest from prospective patients with the beginning of every new year. A Las Vegas Sun article published December 27 notes that people who truly want to lose weight must think beyond quick-fix diets and unsustainable exercise plans if they actually want to make their dreams of becoming permanently thinner and healthier a reality, and that the only path to success is permanent lifestyle change. BHP agrees, but adds that weight loss surgery and other techniques can make dealing with the hard truths of weight loss a great deal easier.

BHP explains that, while weight loss fads typically produce only the most minor and short-lived results, even individuals who set out to make genuine lifestyle changes have an extremely difficult challenge before them. These people are often able to achieve some loss of weight, at least at first. One problem identified by BHP is that, over time, strong desires to overeat actually become all that much stronger the more weight an individual loses – and that means severely obese patients who have the most weight to lose, and the greatest need to lose it, have the hardest task before them. For most, the medical group notes, the constant pangs of appetite are simply too difficult to ignore over the long term.

BHP notes that there is a preponderance of evidence supporting the fact that weight loss surgery options such as the gastric sleeve and Lap Band can make permanently defeating obesity a great deal more achievable because they get to the root of the problem by actually reducing the patient’s appetite. Doctors have found that both of these procedures make it uncomfortable to overeat, while the sleeve procedure – which removes roughly 75 to 85% of the stomach – may also have some added benefits in terms of reducing the body’s production of hunger-stimulating hormones.

Of course, the medical group adds, a great many individuals with weight issues may not meet the definition of severe obesity (a BMI of 40 or more, or 35 or more with related health problems). For them, BHP offers both non-surgical assistance in the form of coaching and medical monitoring, as well as the new Obera balloon weight loss system. They explain that the latter is a temporary procedure which reduces the stomach’s capacity, but is intended for individuals whose weight may be a health issue but who may not be sufficiently obese to be candidates for the other weight loss procedures.

However it is accomplished, experts agree that real weight loss that lasts takes time and commitment – but that doesn’t mean that the challenge can’t be made significantly less difficult with the help of outstanding medical professionals like the team at BHP. To learn more about their options, interested readers can call 800-788-1416, or visit BHP online at http://www.BeverlyHillsPhysicians.com.

Sinus Problems?

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publications, please share your comments below…..

didyouknow?Sinusitis is inflammation of the sinus passages, producing a stuffy head and pain. Antibiotics are usually not effective. Try to use saline rises, decongestants, and pain relievers to ease symptoms until the body heals itself.

The sinuses (the hollow spaces behind the nose) are prone to infection by various microorganisms. In a sinus infection, also called sinusitis, the sensitive lining of the sinuses swells up and gushes mucus, triggering nasal stuffiness, a runny nose, and facial pain. Once upon a time, sinus sufferers headed straight to a doctor to get an antibiotic, but we now know this is usually a waste of time. Most cases of sinusitis are associated with viral infections, which are bulletproof to antibiotics.

Taking simple steps to ease symptoms while the body clears the infection makes the most sense, according to the November 2015 issue of Harvard Men’s Health Watch. “Everybody thinks of antibiotics as the magic cure-all, but the vast majority of people will get better without ever having to consider an antibiotic,” says Dr. Jeffrey Linder, a primary care physician and associate professor of medicine at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Basic self-care steps to soothe symptoms include:

– saline (salt water) rinses, using either a neti pot or prepackaged saline nasal sprays

– decongestants, either in nasal spray or pill form

– pain relievers — any kind is fine, but nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), or aspirin will ease inflammation in addition to pain.

“If you have been doing all the right things for 10 days and you’re not getting better, then it’s totally reasonable to call your doctor and ask about an antibiotic,” Dr. Linder says.

Read the full-length article: “Inflamed sinuses: It’s best to watch and wait”

Also in the November 2015 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch:

– Exercise to banish aches and pains
– Easy diet upgrades
– Is your heartburn pill really working for you?
– How to stop the flu in its tracks

The Harvard Men’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/mens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Occupational Therapy Offers Relief For Hand Pain From Arthritis

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

newsOccupational Therapist Roxanne Perry with Armonk Physical Therapy & Sports Training with tips on how OT can help manage osteoarthritis hand pain and prevent further joint damage.

Opening a jar, buttoning a shirt or brushing your teeth are everyday activities that feel far from routine for those with arthritis in their hands, a highly common condition causing pain and disability for millions of Americans. But occupational therapy, or OT, focusing on the hands can ease pain and increase range of motion for these patients, whether used on its own or after surgery, according to Roxanne Perry, a licensed occupational therapist and certified hand therapist at Armonk Physical Therapy & Sports Training.

With 27 bones in each of our hands (including the carpals which are the small wrist bones and are often involved when a patient has arthritic pain) perhaps it’s not surprising that osteoarthritis is the most common cause of hand arthritis – a word that literally means “inflamed joint.” Osteoarthritis itself is the most common type of arthritis in the United States, affecting about 12% of American adults and occurring when the smooth cartilage covering joints gets worn away because of age or overuse – causing pain, stiffness, swelling and sometimes knobby finger joints.

Hand therapy is a specialized practice area among occupational therapists, who treat these patients to preserve or increase their hand mobility so they’re able to perform everyday tasks more easily and comfortably.

“As a non-surgical option or a way to boost your recovery from hand surgery, occupational therapy is tailored to fit each person’s individual situation and needs, both at home and at work,” says Perry, who has more than 20 years of clinical experience treating injuries of the upper extremity. “The ultimate goal is to restore and optimize the way your hands function as well as to improve your independence and overall quality of life.”

Preventing further joint damage

For those with hand osteoarthritis for which surgery isn’t recommended, OT serves a preventative role, Perry explains. Patients are taught ways to prevent further joint damage, which can include:

Splinting: Immobilizing affected joints, particularly at night, helps them rest when you do and cuts down on joint inflammation, pain and swelling, Perry says. Splints used during sleep are made of a thermoplastic material that stretch and mold closely to the shape of the hand, while neoprene splints may be prescribed during the day to allow movement while also providing support. An occupational therapist will ensure splints are fabricated and fitted to each patient’s needs.

Home exercise program: In addition to working with hand osteoarthritis patients during office visits, occupational therapists also teach them range-of-motion exercises and gentle strengthening techniques they can perform at home. These therapeutic movements may include finger touches, curls, stretches and bends. A typical OT schedule involves office visits twice each week for 4 to 6 weeks and is generally covered by insurance with a prescription.

Information on pain management: Occupational therapists can offer education about over-the-counter and other types of anti-inflammatory medications to reduce pain. Other pain management techniques may include soaking the hands in warm water or dipping them in warm paraffin wax. Additionally an OT can provide information on joint protection and adaptive equipment that can help increase patient’s independence.

“Avoiding further joint damage is a big part of effective treatment for hand arthritis,” Perry notes. “It’s not something you’d want to attempt without the guidance and expertise of an occupational therapist.”

If surgery needed, restoring strength and function

Surgery for osteoarthritis of the hand may be suggested when a patient either suffers from too much pain – a highly individual decision – or too little function. Surgical techniques can include; basal joint arthroplasty, also known as a joint replacement of the thumb, osteotomy, in which part of the bone of a joint is removed to realign the joint, and fusion of the joints, a procedure use when arthritis is particularly bad.

But even in this scenario, OT can play a crucial role in restoring a patient’s quality of life. If surgery is indicated, OT helps patients to manage post-operative pain; reduce swelling; promote wound care and healing; and restore range of motion, strength, and function.

“While a conservative, non-surgical approach is generally successful for managing hand osteoarthritis, sometimes surgery is the best course,” Perry says. “But either way, an occupational therapist can improve patients’ hand function and pain levels, reducing the stress on involved joints. OT shouldn’t be a last resort – it should be the first thought for people who develop hand arthritis.”

– Armonk Physical Therapy & Sports Training has provided personalized, integrative, and skilled one-on-one physical therapy services to residents of Westchester/lower Fairfield counties since 2001. http://www.armonkptst.com/ – Roxanne Perry, OTR, CHT, is a licensed occupational therapist and certified hand therapist at Armonk Physical Therapy & Sports Training.